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PETER JENNER

Manager
Sincere Management

After gaining a First Class Honours Degree in Economics at Cambridge University, Peter Jenner became a Lecturer at the London School of Economics at the tender age of twenty-one.

His career in academia lasted four years after which he left to devote his attention to managing an up-and-coming modern music group that had caught his attention. The band’s name was Pink Floyd.

Jenner then put on a series of free concerts in London’s Hyde Park that culminated with The Rolling Stones in 1969. Now, after more than forty years in the music business, the list of clients he has worked with reads like a Who’s Who of musical successes. He has managed Tyrannosaurus Rex (fronted by Marc Bolan), helped set up Harvest Records and produced and managed many of its bands – notably Roy Harper, The Edgar Broughton Band and Kevin Ayers.

He then on went to manage and produce Ian Dury and the Blockheads and manage The Clash, The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy, Michael Franti, Robyn Hitchcock, Eddi Reader and Baaba Maal, amongst others. Currently, Jenner manages Billy Bragg’s career and has done so for more than twenty five years.

He is President Emeritus of the IMMF, a director of the UK MMF (Music Managers’ Forum) and on the advisory board of The Featured Artists Coalition. Jenner has also taken an active role in discussions on future digital music delivery systems and payment to artists, in many countries. He has an overriding interest in securing artists rights and their income from these rights and has spoken frequently and publicly on the subject. In 2006, Jenner courted controversy with a seminal paper and subsequent conference called ‘Beyond the Soundbytes’. Here, he proposed an ‘Access to Music Charge’ that he saw as some small compensation for artists, in addition to removing the attraction of using unauthorised sites in the digital environment. However he accepts that the Control of Copyright is no longer a practical approach and that the challenge has become getting appropriate remuneration for the digital use of music.